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IC 4685

This image covers a massive star formation region approximately 4 kly away, and contains several nebulae. The largest is the emission nebula IC 4685, in the central portion of this photograph. The dark, dust lane of Barnard 303 snakes across it and points to the bright, white star (V3903 Sgr; an Orion-type variable) in the middle right. The blue reflection nebula on the lower right is NGC 6559. In the lower left corner is fainter IC 1275. It is possible that the emission nebulae are part of a ri

Gary

Gary

IC 1274

There is rather a lot going on in this image. IC 1274 is the circular structure in the top, middle-right section of this photo. It is an HII region, sitting on the near edge of  a seriously large molecular cloud known as Lynds 227. A dark nebula (Barnard 91) defines the top edge of the nebula. The bright star in the center of IC 1274 is a young, energetic B0 V star (HD 166033); current thinking is that this is the star that has blown this massive bubble (Dahm et al., 2011). The nebula, itself, c

Gary

Gary

The South Pillars

The Carina Nebula, where the South Pillars region exists, has an incredible array of fascinating objects and processes. In this image, for instance, we see pillars - also known colloquially as "elephant trunks" - of dust in which stars are being born. The best example in this photo is in the lower left quadrant. Recent research (McLeod et al., 2016) has suggested that such pillars are likely to disappear once the star comes into being due to a process known as photoevaporation, in which the powe

Gary

Gary

Fornax Cluster

These four are a suite of galaxies that are part of the Fornax cluster. Clockwise from top left: NGC 1375 (34 Mly), 1380 (86 Mly), 1373 (61 Mly), & 1374 (59 Mly). There are plenty of other galaxies visible in the background. Look for the elongated smudges of light. Date: 10 October 2016 Constellation: Fornax RA: 03h 35' 57" Dec:  -35° 05′ 04.1″ Photo stuff: 32 subs@300s ea.; ISO 800; Canon 60Da on Meade RCX400 16" f/8; .70 focal reducer  

Gary

Gary

The 9 stars of Matariki

Matariki is the Māori name for a cluster of stars. This year, from July 6 to 9, Matariki will re-appear in the dawn sky – signalling the start of the Māori New Year.   It is a time to celebrate new life, to remember those who’ve passed and to plan for the future. And it’s a time to spend with whānau and friends – to enjoy kai (food), waiata (song), tākaro (games) and haka.   Our tūpuna (ancestors) would look to Matariki for help with their harvesting. When Matariki disappeared in April/M

Astro Tours

Astro Tours

Winter solstice

At 22:07 tonight the sun reaches the northernmost point in it’s annual journey around the sky. We go past our shortest day and from tomorrow the days get longer. So, if you are in the Southern hemisphere, happy winter solstice. It’s also the longest night of the year, so go out and enjoy our amazing Southern Hemisphere sky! 

Astro Tours

Astro Tours

The rise of Matariki

The rise of Matariki signified the start of the New Year for Maori. This year Matariki begins today and if you’re a keen stargazer hoping for a glimpse of the star cluster tonight, then you need to be aware of the simple fact that catches out 99% of people interested in viewing the constellation: It rises early in the morning. At when first viewed is quickly extinguished by sunrise. As the year goes on though, it does get higher in the sky, but New Year is about the RISING, so you need to get up

Astro Tours

Astro Tours

A sky full of planets

The night sky is continuing to fill up with planets with all of them visible at some point during the night. Now all we need are some clear skies. Keep watching our weather pages for a guide as to the probability of getting some views. Maybe not the most impressive shot of Jupiter you ever saw. What if I tell you that it was taken with a standard phone camera through our main telescope? Jupiter is nice and up in the sky with the four moons visible most of the time.

Astro Tours

Astro Tours

Alpha Crucis

I love the halo effect on Acrux when photographed. The bright star Alpha Crucis marks the base of the Southern Cross, and at magnitude 0.8, ranks as one of the brightest stars in the southern skies. Also known as Acrux, this star is an excellent multiple star system for binoculars and a small telescope. And it’s one of the few double stars that can be resolved with a telescope during daylight hours. Acrux could not be easier to find. At magnitude 0.8, it’s the brightest star in the con

Astro Tours

Astro Tours

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